What documentary are you watching on YouTube right now?

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Dr. Medulla
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Re: What documentary are you watching on YouTube right now?

Post by Dr. Medulla » 26 Feb 2019, 2:12pm

https://darkcircleroom4.blogspot.com/20 ... -1990.html

Documentary about West Berlin's Hansa studio. It was a bit of a shrug for me. Lot of big names and big albums recorded there and people talk about it. Informative without having a real point to make. But there are enough fans of the artists here that folks might enjoy the footage and remembrance.
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Re: What documentary are you watching on YouTube right now?

Post by Dr. Medulla » 09 Mar 2019, 8:40am

Image
Watched this morning, and will likely be buying a copy as it might be worthwhile for classroom use. It's a bit uneven, torn between telling the story of WLIR, the key American radio station for breaking alternative bands (mainly from the UK) in the 80s, and celebrating the music itself. The former provides good material for discussion about how artists gain exposure, markets, human agency, and all that; the latter is entertaining, but more an exercise in nostalgia. All in all, most people here would enjoy this, I think.
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Re: What documentary are you watching on YouTube right now?

Post by JennyB » 11 Mar 2019, 9:52am

Dr. Medulla wrote:
09 Mar 2019, 8:40am
Image
Watched this morning, and will likely be buying a copy as it might be worthwhile for classroom use. It's a bit uneven, torn between telling the story of WLIR, the key American radio station for breaking alternative bands (mainly from the UK) in the 80s, and celebrating the music itself. The former provides good material for discussion about how artists gain exposure, markets, human agency, and all that; the latter is entertaining, but more an exercise in nostalgia. All in all, most people here would enjoy this, I think.
I have seen it and really enjoyed it. But I was definitely in their target audience.
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Re: What documentary are you watching on YouTube right now?

Post by Dr. Medulla » 11 Mar 2019, 9:57am

JennyB wrote:
11 Mar 2019, 9:52am
Dr. Medulla wrote:
09 Mar 2019, 8:40am
Image
Watched this morning, and will likely be buying a copy as it might be worthwhile for classroom use. It's a bit uneven, torn between telling the story of WLIR, the key American radio station for breaking alternative bands (mainly from the UK) in the 80s, and celebrating the music itself. The former provides good material for discussion about how artists gain exposure, markets, human agency, and all that; the latter is entertaining, but more an exercise in nostalgia. All in all, most people here would enjoy this, I think.
I have seen it and really enjoyed it. But I was definitely in their target audience.
Depending on how much you remember of it, do you think there's enough in there to support a discussion about radio as an institution and how hits are made? I'm thinking there is, but perhaps only with a lot of other background reading.
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Re: What documentary are you watching on YouTube right now?

Post by JennyB » 11 Mar 2019, 10:07am

Dr. Medulla wrote:
11 Mar 2019, 9:57am
JennyB wrote:
11 Mar 2019, 9:52am
Dr. Medulla wrote:
09 Mar 2019, 8:40am
Image
Watched this morning, and will likely be buying a copy as it might be worthwhile for classroom use. It's a bit uneven, torn between telling the story of WLIR, the key American radio station for breaking alternative bands (mainly from the UK) in the 80s, and celebrating the music itself. The former provides good material for discussion about how artists gain exposure, markets, human agency, and all that; the latter is entertaining, but more an exercise in nostalgia. All in all, most people here would enjoy this, I think.
I have seen it and really enjoyed it. But I was definitely in their target audience.
Depending on how much you remember of it, do you think there's enough in there to support a discussion about radio as an institution and how hits are made? I'm thinking there is, but perhaps only with a lot of other background reading.
I think so, but with the caveat that this was probably limited to the coasts and hipper cities (like Denver) in flyover country. I can assure you that none of this music was familiar to any kid in St. Louis at the time, save for a very few. Kids in cities like St. Louis were either listening to top 40 (Ok, so Billy Idol would fall under that category, and maybe Blondie in the early 80s) and classic rock. And I would imagine more were listening to classic rock stations than top 40. When we moved her in 1988, there were three huge classic rock stations and one top 40.

It wasn't until the commercial alternative boom in 1992-93 did St. Louis get an "alternative" station, and for them, that meant grunge.
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Re: What documentary are you watching on YouTube right now?

Post by Dr. Medulla » 11 Mar 2019, 10:12am

JennyB wrote:
11 Mar 2019, 10:07am
Dr. Medulla wrote:
11 Mar 2019, 9:57am
JennyB wrote:
11 Mar 2019, 9:52am
Dr. Medulla wrote:
09 Mar 2019, 8:40am
Image
Watched this morning, and will likely be buying a copy as it might be worthwhile for classroom use. It's a bit uneven, torn between telling the story of WLIR, the key American radio station for breaking alternative bands (mainly from the UK) in the 80s, and celebrating the music itself. The former provides good material for discussion about how artists gain exposure, markets, human agency, and all that; the latter is entertaining, but more an exercise in nostalgia. All in all, most people here would enjoy this, I think.
I have seen it and really enjoyed it. But I was definitely in their target audience.
Depending on how much you remember of it, do you think there's enough in there to support a discussion about radio as an institution and how hits are made? I'm thinking there is, but perhaps only with a lot of other background reading.
I think so, but with the caveat that this was probably limited to the coasts and hipper cities (like Denver) in flyover country. I can assure you that none of this music was familiar to any kid in St. Louis at the time, save for a very few. Kids in cities like St. Louis were either listening to top 40 (Ok, so Billy Idol would fall under that category, and maybe Blondie in the early 80s) and classic rock. And I would imagine more were listening to classic rock stations than top 40. When we moved her in 1988, there were three huge classic rock stations and one top 40.

It wasn't until the commercial alternative boom in 1992-93 did St. Louis get an "alternative" station, and for them, that meant grunge.
Yeah, WLIR's significance only makes sense in connection with MTV—that's the national coverage right there. Growing up in Rat's Ass, SK, I had no cool radio—it wasn't until I was in university that CBC-FM late night was where alt music got played—so MuchMusic was where I heard the weird stuff.
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Re: What documentary are you watching on YouTube right now?

Post by revbob » 11 Mar 2019, 1:01pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
11 Mar 2019, 10:12am
JennyB wrote:
11 Mar 2019, 10:07am
Dr. Medulla wrote:
11 Mar 2019, 9:57am
JennyB wrote:
11 Mar 2019, 9:52am
Dr. Medulla wrote:
09 Mar 2019, 8:40am
Image
Watched this morning, and will likely be buying a copy as it might be worthwhile for classroom use. It's a bit uneven, torn between telling the story of WLIR, the key American radio station for breaking alternative bands (mainly from the UK) in the 80s, and celebrating the music itself. The former provides good material for discussion about how artists gain exposure, markets, human agency, and all that; the latter is entertaining, but more an exercise in nostalgia. All in all, most people here would enjoy this, I think.
I have seen it and really enjoyed it. But I was definitely in their target audience.
Depending on how much you remember of it, do you think there's enough in there to support a discussion about radio as an institution and how hits are made? I'm thinking there is, but perhaps only with a lot of other background reading.
I think so, but with the caveat that this was probably limited to the coasts and hipper cities (like Denver) in flyover country. I can assure you that none of this music was familiar to any kid in St. Louis at the time, save for a very few. Kids in cities like St. Louis were either listening to top 40 (Ok, so Billy Idol would fall under that category, and maybe Blondie in the early 80s) and classic rock. And I would imagine more were listening to classic rock stations than top 40. When we moved her in 1988, there were three huge classic rock stations and one top 40.

It wasn't until the commercial alternative boom in 1992-93 did St. Louis get an "alternative" station, and for them, that meant grunge.
Yeah, WLIR's significance only makes sense in connection with MTV—that's the national coverage right there. Growing up in Rat's Ass, SK, I had no cool radio—it wasn't until I was in university that CBC-FM late night was where alt music got played—so MuchMusic was where I heard the weird stuff.
I should probably watch this. I remember WLIR, was able to tune in growing up. Somehow their signal made it across the sound and the Hudson. I recall when they switched to that format. But to be honest I had a ton of stations to listen to once I started exploring I mostly stopped listening to commercial radio, college and community radio were pretty strong back in the 80s where the real daring if you want to call it that stuff was happening. There was a similar station to WLIR in New Jersey, not WFMU, it was a commercial station I think out of the Jersey shore area, I believe on the right end of the dial. Can't for the life of me remember its letters or frequency though.

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