The Mighty Musical Observations Thread

General music discussion.
coffeepotman
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Re: The Mighty Musical Observations Thread

Post by coffeepotman » 10 Mar 2019, 9:44am

101Walterton wrote:
09 Mar 2019, 2:41pm
Heston wrote:
08 Mar 2019, 5:48pm
I loved Happy Days until the end, even the episode with Spunkless Spunky in.
Was essential viewing when I was st school but I’m suprised it kept going 1984. I wouldn’t have watched past 1982.
Isn't Happy Days where the phrase "jump the shark" came from? It was a great show, first season, then got sillier as it went until Fonzie jumped the shark. I do remember all the 50's revival/nostalgia that went along with it was kinda cool back in the ugly 70's.

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Re: The Mighty Musical Observations Thread

Post by Dr. Medulla » 10 Mar 2019, 9:57am

coffeepotman wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 9:44am
101Walterton wrote:
09 Mar 2019, 2:41pm
Heston wrote:
08 Mar 2019, 5:48pm
I loved Happy Days until the end, even the episode with Spunkless Spunky in.
Was essential viewing when I was st school but I’m suprised it kept going 1984. I wouldn’t have watched past 1982.
Isn't Happy Days where the phrase "jump the shark" came from? It was a great show, first season, then got sillier as it went until Fonzie jumped the shark. I do remember all the 50's revival/nostalgia that went along with it was kinda cool back in the ugly 70's.
Yup, correct. Fun fact: The evil water skier whom Fonzie beat was evil Greg Marmalard of the Omegas in Animal House.
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Re: The Mighty Musical Observations Thread

Post by Flex » 10 Mar 2019, 2:18pm

I just read an article in Ars Technica about the vinyl revival, and it somewhat unexpectedly (to me, anyways) turned it into a discussion of lessons to learn for digital content creation. A lot of it was a discussion of the importance of ritual, which is well covered ground, but I thought it brought up an interesting point: content tends to resonate more with people when it's a multi-sensory experience. Vinyl has visual aesthetics, tactile feel, and - of course - the auditory experience. Triggering three senses makes for a more pleasurable and enduring experience for people. The article just kinda asserted that to be true, but it makes intuitive sense: if you stimulate more of your senses, the content in question packs more of a punch. No real point, just thought it was an interesting takeaway.
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101Walterton
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Re: The Mighty Musical Observations Thread

Post by 101Walterton » 10 Mar 2019, 2:38pm

Flex wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 2:18pm
I just read an article in Ars Technica about the vinyl revival, and it somewhat unexpectedly (to me, anyways) turned it into a discussion of lessons to learn for digital content creation. A lot of it was a discussion of the importance of ritual, which is well covered ground, but I thought it brought up an interesting point: content tends to resonate more with people when it's a multi-sensory experience. Vinyl has visual aesthetics, tactile feel, and - of course - the auditory experience. Triggering three senses makes for a more pleasurable and enduring experience for people. The article just kinda asserted that to be true, but it makes intuitive sense: if you stimulate more of your senses, the content in question packs more of a punch. No real point, just thought it was an interesting takeaway.
Yes and I absolutely agree. You only have to see the cover of an album you love and you get the same sense of pleasure as you do from hearing a song that you love.

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Re: The Mighty Musical Observations Thread

Post by Marky Dread » 10 Mar 2019, 3:49pm

My favourite vinyl album is Smell the Glove by Spinal Tap.
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Re: The Mighty Musical Observations Thread

Post by Silent Majority » 10 Mar 2019, 3:51pm

What's wrong with being sexy?
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Re: The Mighty Musical Observations Thread

Post by revbob » 10 Mar 2019, 4:43pm

101Walterton wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 2:38pm
Flex wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 2:18pm
I just read an article in Ars Technica about the vinyl revival, and it somewhat unexpectedly (to me, anyways) turned it into a discussion of lessons to learn for digital content creation. A lot of it was a discussion of the importance of ritual, which is well covered ground, but I thought it brought up an interesting point: content tends to resonate more with people when it's a multi-sensory experience. Vinyl has visual aesthetics, tactile feel, and - of course - the auditory experience. Triggering three senses makes for a more pleasurable and enduring experience for people. The article just kinda asserted that to be true, but it makes intuitive sense: if you stimulate more of your senses, the content in question packs more of a punch. No real point, just thought it was an interesting takeaway.
Yes and I absolutely agree. You only have to see the cover of an album you love and you get the same sense of pleasure as you do from hearing a song that you love.
Yeah and CD size isn't quite the same.

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Re: The Mighty Musical Observations Thread

Post by 101Walterton » 10 Mar 2019, 4:47pm

revbob wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 4:43pm
101Walterton wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 2:38pm
Flex wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 2:18pm
I just read an article in Ars Technica about the vinyl revival, and it somewhat unexpectedly (to me, anyways) turned it into a discussion of lessons to learn for digital content creation. A lot of it was a discussion of the importance of ritual, which is well covered ground, but I thought it brought up an interesting point: content tends to resonate more with people when it's a multi-sensory experience. Vinyl has visual aesthetics, tactile feel, and - of course - the auditory experience. Triggering three senses makes for a more pleasurable and enduring experience for people. The article just kinda asserted that to be true, but it makes intuitive sense: if you stimulate more of your senses, the content in question packs more of a punch. No real point, just thought it was an interesting takeaway.
Yes and I absolutely agree. You only have to see the cover of an album you love and you get the same sense of pleasure as you do from hearing a song that you love.
Yeah and CD size isn't quite the same.
No and was the beginning of disposable music!!!

revbob
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Re: The Mighty Musical Observations Thread

Post by revbob » 10 Mar 2019, 4:55pm

101Walterton wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 4:47pm
revbob wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 4:43pm
101Walterton wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 2:38pm
Flex wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 2:18pm
I just read an article in Ars Technica about the vinyl revival, and it somewhat unexpectedly (to me, anyways) turned it into a discussion of lessons to learn for digital content creation. A lot of it was a discussion of the importance of ritual, which is well covered ground, but I thought it brought up an interesting point: content tends to resonate more with people when it's a multi-sensory experience. Vinyl has visual aesthetics, tactile feel, and - of course - the auditory experience. Triggering three senses makes for a more pleasurable and enduring experience for people. The article just kinda asserted that to be true, but it makes intuitive sense: if you stimulate more of your senses, the content in question packs more of a punch. No real point, just thought it was an interesting takeaway.
Yes and I absolutely agree. You only have to see the cover of an album you love and you get the same sense of pleasure as you do from hearing a song that you love.
Yeah and CD size isn't quite the same.
No and was the beginning of disposable music!!!
That's a term I use a lot.

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Re: The Mighty Musical Observations Thread

Post by Dr. Medulla » 10 Mar 2019, 5:41pm

101Walterton wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 4:47pm
revbob wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 4:43pm
101Walterton wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 2:38pm
Flex wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 2:18pm
I just read an article in Ars Technica about the vinyl revival, and it somewhat unexpectedly (to me, anyways) turned it into a discussion of lessons to learn for digital content creation. A lot of it was a discussion of the importance of ritual, which is well covered ground, but I thought it brought up an interesting point: content tends to resonate more with people when it's a multi-sensory experience. Vinyl has visual aesthetics, tactile feel, and - of course - the auditory experience. Triggering three senses makes for a more pleasurable and enduring experience for people. The article just kinda asserted that to be true, but it makes intuitive sense: if you stimulate more of your senses, the content in question packs more of a punch. No real point, just thought it was an interesting takeaway.
Yes and I absolutely agree. You only have to see the cover of an album you love and you get the same sense of pleasure as you do from hearing a song that you love.
Yeah and CD size isn't quite the same.
No and was the beginning of disposable music!!!
The thing is, any mass produced commodity is by nature disposable. That is, to some critics, proof that it can't be art.
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101Walterton
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Re: The Mighty Musical Observations Thread

Post by 101Walterton » 10 Mar 2019, 6:27pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 5:41pm
101Walterton wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 4:47pm
revbob wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 4:43pm
101Walterton wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 2:38pm
Flex wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 2:18pm
I just read an article in Ars Technica about the vinyl revival, and it somewhat unexpectedly (to me, anyways) turned it into a discussion of lessons to learn for digital content creation. A lot of it was a discussion of the importance of ritual, which is well covered ground, but I thought it brought up an interesting point: content tends to resonate more with people when it's a multi-sensory experience. Vinyl has visual aesthetics, tactile feel, and - of course - the auditory experience. Triggering three senses makes for a more pleasurable and enduring experience for people. The article just kinda asserted that to be true, but it makes intuitive sense: if you stimulate more of your senses, the content in question packs more of a punch. No real point, just thought it was an interesting takeaway.
Yes and I absolutely agree. You only have to see the cover of an album you love and you get the same sense of pleasure as you do from hearing a song that you love.
Yeah and CD size isn't quite the same.
No and was the beginning of disposable music!!!
The thing is, any mass produced commodity is by nature disposable. That is, to some critics, proof that it can't be art.
Yes but you used to invest in a piece of vinyl and then needed to store it and play it from track one. The CD with random / skip buttons and stack trays etc.. changed how we listen to music.
Then came the ability to download the CD so no need for the physical product at all.

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Re: The Mighty Musical Observations Thread

Post by Dr. Medulla » 10 Mar 2019, 6:33pm

101Walterton wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 6:27pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 5:41pm
101Walterton wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 4:47pm
revbob wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 4:43pm
101Walterton wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 2:38pm


Yes and I absolutely agree. You only have to see the cover of an album you love and you get the same sense of pleasure as you do from hearing a song that you love.
Yeah and CD size isn't quite the same.
No and was the beginning of disposable music!!!
The thing is, any mass produced commodity is by nature disposable. That is, to some critics, proof that it can't be art.
Yes but you used to invest in a piece of vinyl and then needed to store it and play it from track one. The CD with random / skip buttons and stack trays etc.. changed how we listen to music.
Then came the ability to download the CD so no need for the physical product at all.
The cd just made it more convenient to pick which songs you wanted to listen to and in what order (and digital downloads more so yet). You can pick up the tone arm and plop it down wherever you want. The cassette or 8-track, by that reasoning, is the best form because it's such a fucking pain to find the song you want unless it's the first one on the side.
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Re: The Mighty Musical Observations Thread

Post by gkbill » 10 Mar 2019, 6:44pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 6:33pm
101Walterton wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 6:27pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 5:41pm
101Walterton wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 4:47pm
revbob wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 4:43pm


Yeah and CD size isn't quite the same.
No and was the beginning of disposable music!!!
The thing is, any mass produced commodity is by nature disposable. That is, to some critics, proof that it can't be art.
Yes but you used to invest in a piece of vinyl and then needed to store it and play it from track one. The CD with random / skip buttons and stack trays etc.. changed how we listen to music.
Then came the ability to download the CD so no need for the physical product at all.
The cd just made it more convenient to pick which songs you wanted to listen to and in what order (and digital downloads more so yet). You can pick up the tone arm and plop it down wherever you want. The cassette or 8-track, by that reasoning, is the best form because it's such a fucking pain to find the song you want unless it's the first one on the side.
Hello,

It was too much of a task (and I wasn't really good at it) to drop the needle into the appropriate groove. Cassettes eventually got next track/fast forward - but that was for rich kids who could afford it. 8-tracks never got that far.

Vinyl was great because more often than not I'd listen to a complete side in the order provided and appreciate all the tracks. I never brought records to parties as they generally got all scratched to hell by drunk amateur dj's.

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Re: The Mighty Musical Observations Thread

Post by Dr. Medulla » 10 Mar 2019, 7:11pm

gkbill wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 6:44pm
It was too much of a task (and I wasn't really good at it) to drop the needle into the appropriate groove. Cassettes eventually got next track/fast forward - but that was for rich kids who could afford it. 8-tracks never got that far.
Ka-CHUNK!
Vinyl was great because more often than not I'd listen to a complete side in the order provided and appreciate all the tracks. I never brought records to parties as they generally got all scratched to hell by drunk amateur dj's.
Just for the sake of argument, why is it superior to listen in the order that the artist places them? Is the listening experience about fealty to the artist or about what the listener wants? If I think CtC is flawless except that "Fingerpoppin'" should be the lead song and that "This Is England" be excised for being tolerable, I have every right to listen to it in that order, and so a medium that facilitates that ability is superior to one that makes it harder.
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101Walterton
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Re: The Mighty Musical Observations Thread

Post by 101Walterton » 10 Mar 2019, 7:18pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 7:11pm
gkbill wrote:
10 Mar 2019, 6:44pm
It was too much of a task (and I wasn't really good at it) to drop the needle into the appropriate groove. Cassettes eventually got next track/fast forward - but that was for rich kids who could afford it. 8-tracks never got that far.
Ka-CHUNK!
Vinyl was great because more often than not I'd listen to a complete side in the order provided and appreciate all the tracks. I never brought records to parties as they generally got all scratched to hell by drunk amateur dj's.
Just for the sake of argument, why is it superior to listen in the order that the artist places them? Is the listening experience about fealty to the artist or about what the listener wants? If I think CtC is flawless except that "Fingerpoppin'" should be the lead song and that "This Is England" be excised for being tolerable, I have every right to listen to it in that order, and so a medium that facilitates that ability is superior to one that makes it harder.
I would say that it is fine to shuffle a CD if you want however back to my original point with vinyl you bought something that you listened to as intended. Shuffling, skipping, programming tracks was the start of disposable music where you could do what you want with it.
With vinyl you invested time in it so grew to love (or not) all those album tracks over time. You don’t need to invest time in a CD.

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