The Beatles song you're thinking about right now thread

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WestwayKid
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Re: The Beatles song you're thinking about right now thread

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Dr. Medulla wrote:
25 Mar 2020, 6:05pm
WestwayKid wrote:
25 Mar 2020, 5:54pm
I'm stuck at work, but I've been working my way through their catalog today. They were my first introduction to rock music as a young kid via my dad and after all these years and all of these listens...the music still holds up. Were they the only good band to come out of the 60's? No, but it's also become somewhat trendy to call them overrated. The Beatles were not overrated. "I'm Happy Just To Dance With You" is currently playing. It's not one of their "better" tracks, but it's still a really solid piece of power pop.
When I've taught my rock class, I've always had students who call the Beatles overrated, but when I interrogate what they mean, it's really that their parents like them. I'm pretty "different strokes for different folks" when it comes to music, but I truly don't understand people who say they hate the Beatles.
I just started Rob Sheffield's new book about why The Beatles remain so popular. Only a few pages in, but I like it.
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Re: The Beatles song you're thinking about right now thread

Post by Marky Dread »

Dr. Medulla wrote:
25 Mar 2020, 6:05pm
WestwayKid wrote:
25 Mar 2020, 5:54pm
I'm stuck at work, but I've been working my way through their catalog today. They were my first introduction to rock music as a young kid via my dad and after all these years and all of these listens...the music still holds up. Were they the only good band to come out of the 60's? No, but it's also become somewhat trendy to call them overrated. The Beatles were not overrated. "I'm Happy Just To Dance With You" is currently playing. It's not one of their "better" tracks, but it's still a really solid piece of power pop.
When I've taught my rock class, I've always had students who call the Beatles overrated, but when I interrogate what they mean, it's really that their parents like them. I'm pretty "different strokes for different folks" when it comes to music, but I truly don't understand people who say they hate the Beatles.
Way too many great songs to hate a band like The Beatles. A fair few crap songs also but just too many to admire that set out a blue print for so many to follow.

I think their legendary status becomes a bit overbearing at times. You know it's The Beatles so it must be great blah blah. But some magical early pop nuggets followed by that psych period is just too good to deny.
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Re: The Beatles song you're thinking about right now thread

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WestwayKid wrote:
25 Mar 2020, 6:21pm
I just started Rob Sheffield's new book about why The Beatles remain so popular. Only a few pages in, but I like it.
I neither liked nor disliked it. It's enjoyable because it's about the Beatles—the story's been told so many times but it's still captivating—but there wasn't anything distinct about it.
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Re: The Beatles song you're thinking about right now thread

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Marky Dread wrote:
25 Mar 2020, 6:23pm
Way too many great songs to hate a band like The Beatles. A fair few crap songs also but just too many to admire that set out a blue print for so many to follow.

I think their legendary status becomes a bit overbearing at times. You know it's The Beatles so it must be great blah blah. But some magical early pop nuggets followed by that psych period is just too good to deny.
It's just a case where the kneejerk suspicion of lazy hype actually fails the cynical. It's insane to consider how far they came in such a short period and consistently dragged everyone else with them. I'm a solid social historian—that is, it's larger social trends and systems that dominate history, not "great men"—but the Beatles confound that. Their talent, personality, and restless curiosity actually steered things in ways that few other artists ever could hope to do.
Back off, or I'll blow the roof off—with sound!

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Re: The Beatles song you're thinking about right now thread

Post by Marky Dread »

Dr. Medulla wrote:
25 Mar 2020, 6:43pm
Marky Dread wrote:
25 Mar 2020, 6:23pm
Way too many great songs to hate a band like The Beatles. A fair few crap songs also but just too many to admire that set out a blue print for so many to follow.

I think their legendary status becomes a bit overbearing at times. You know it's The Beatles so it must be great blah blah. But some magical early pop nuggets followed by that psych period is just too good to deny.
It's just a case where the kneejerk suspicion of lazy hype actually fails the cynical. It's insane to consider how far they came in such a short period and consistently dragged everyone else with them. I'm a solid social historian—that is, it's larger social trends and systems that dominate history, not "great men"—but the Beatles confound that. Their talent, personality, and restless curiosity actually steered things in ways that few other artists ever could hope to do.
Timing and talent played a huge part here of course. But boy what talent it is.
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Re: The Beatles song you're thinking about right now thread

Post by Kory »

Marky Dread wrote:
25 Mar 2020, 6:23pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
25 Mar 2020, 6:05pm
WestwayKid wrote:
25 Mar 2020, 5:54pm
I'm stuck at work, but I've been working my way through their catalog today. They were my first introduction to rock music as a young kid via my dad and after all these years and all of these listens...the music still holds up. Were they the only good band to come out of the 60's? No, but it's also become somewhat trendy to call them overrated. The Beatles were not overrated. "I'm Happy Just To Dance With You" is currently playing. It's not one of their "better" tracks, but it's still a really solid piece of power pop.
When I've taught my rock class, I've always had students who call the Beatles overrated, but when I interrogate what they mean, it's really that their parents like them. I'm pretty "different strokes for different folks" when it comes to music, but I truly don't understand people who say they hate the Beatles.
Way too many great songs to hate a band like The Beatles. A fair few crap songs also but just too many to admire that set out a blue print for so many to follow.

I think their legendary status becomes a bit overbearing at times. You know it's The Beatles so it must be great blah blah. But some magical early pop nuggets followed by that psych period is just too good to deny.
I hated them for years because of their ubiquity, but as soon as I got into them, when I tried to convert other friends, the only critique they could muster was "yeah, but it's the Beatles."
WWK: I feel confident we haven't heard the last from Dr. Harvey Camel.

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Re: The Beatles song you're thinking about right now thread

Post by Kory »

Dr. Medulla wrote:
25 Mar 2020, 6:43pm
Marky Dread wrote:
25 Mar 2020, 6:23pm
Way too many great songs to hate a band like The Beatles. A fair few crap songs also but just too many to admire that set out a blue print for so many to follow.

I think their legendary status becomes a bit overbearing at times. You know it's The Beatles so it must be great blah blah. But some magical early pop nuggets followed by that psych period is just too good to deny.
It's just a case where the kneejerk suspicion of lazy hype actually fails the cynical. It's insane to consider how far they came in such a short period and consistently dragged everyone else with them. I'm a solid social historian—that is, it's larger social trends and systems that dominate history, not "great men"—but the Beatles confound that. Their talent, personality, and restless curiosity actually steered things in ways that few other artists ever could hope to do.
I have a friend that is deeply resistant to liking things just because of historical context. If they don't still play well in the current time and not sound dated, he's not interested.
WWK: I feel confident we haven't heard the last from Dr. Harvey Camel.

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Re: The Beatles song you're thinking about right now thread

Post by Dr. Medulla »

Kory wrote:
26 Mar 2020, 1:21pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
25 Mar 2020, 6:43pm
Marky Dread wrote:
25 Mar 2020, 6:23pm
Way too many great songs to hate a band like The Beatles. A fair few crap songs also but just too many to admire that set out a blue print for so many to follow.

I think their legendary status becomes a bit overbearing at times. You know it's The Beatles so it must be great blah blah. But some magical early pop nuggets followed by that psych period is just too good to deny.
It's just a case where the kneejerk suspicion of lazy hype actually fails the cynical. It's insane to consider how far they came in such a short period and consistently dragged everyone else with them. I'm a solid social historian—that is, it's larger social trends and systems that dominate history, not "great men"—but the Beatles confound that. Their talent, personality, and restless curiosity actually steered things in ways that few other artists ever could hope to do.
I have a friend that is deeply resistant to liking things just because of historical context. If they don't still play well in the current time and not sound dated, he's not interested.
That kind insularity to history, I've long thought, is a silent admission of one's own irrelevance. Unless you can somehow stay current, keeping up with trends, anything you once accomplished is garbage. It's a perspective without foundation because trend is by its very nature always evolving. It's a rather postmodern position, but one that illustrates to me what's so fundamentally horrible about postmodernism—that in rejecting standards, it rejects value of any kind because it's all utterly transitory.
Back off, or I'll blow the roof off—with sound!

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Re: The Beatles song you're thinking about right now thread

Post by Kory »

Dr. Medulla wrote:
26 Mar 2020, 1:33pm
Kory wrote:
26 Mar 2020, 1:21pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
25 Mar 2020, 6:43pm
Marky Dread wrote:
25 Mar 2020, 6:23pm
Way too many great songs to hate a band like The Beatles. A fair few crap songs also but just too many to admire that set out a blue print for so many to follow.

I think their legendary status becomes a bit overbearing at times. You know it's The Beatles so it must be great blah blah. But some magical early pop nuggets followed by that psych period is just too good to deny.
It's just a case where the kneejerk suspicion of lazy hype actually fails the cynical. It's insane to consider how far they came in such a short period and consistently dragged everyone else with them. I'm a solid social historian—that is, it's larger social trends and systems that dominate history, not "great men"—but the Beatles confound that. Their talent, personality, and restless curiosity actually steered things in ways that few other artists ever could hope to do.
I have a friend that is deeply resistant to liking things just because of historical context. If they don't still play well in the current time and not sound dated, he's not interested.
That kind insularity to history, I've long thought, is a silent admission of one's own irrelevance. Unless you can somehow stay current, keeping up with trends, anything you once accomplished is garbage. It's a perspective without foundation because trend is by its very nature always evolving. It's a rather postmodern position, but one that illustrates to me what's so fundamentally horrible about postmodernism—that in rejecting standards, it rejects value of any kind because it's all utterly transitory.
I'm not sure how he'd respond to that. He's very analytical and lacking in emotion (I actually suspect he's a low-level sociopath), and I think a lot of his opinions on music and art come from what he's read and memorized (he's a medical doctor) rather than what he actually thinks (if he's even capable of coming up with his own opinions on it). I once caught him reciting program notes from a symphony we attended almost verbatim as his own opinion. The way he usually responds to stuff like the Beatles is "just because it's historically important doesn't mean it's good." Which is not wrong, I guess, but it does close his mind before he gives anything a chance.
WWK: I feel confident we haven't heard the last from Dr. Harvey Camel.

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Re: The Beatles song you're thinking about right now thread

Post by Marky Dread »

Kory wrote:
26 Mar 2020, 2:17pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
26 Mar 2020, 1:33pm
Kory wrote:
26 Mar 2020, 1:21pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
25 Mar 2020, 6:43pm
Marky Dread wrote:
25 Mar 2020, 6:23pm
Way too many great songs to hate a band like The Beatles. A fair few crap songs also but just too many to admire that set out a blue print for so many to follow.

I think their legendary status becomes a bit overbearing at times. You know it's The Beatles so it must be great blah blah. But some magical early pop nuggets followed by that psych period is just too good to deny.
It's just a case where the kneejerk suspicion of lazy hype actually fails the cynical. It's insane to consider how far they came in such a short period and consistently dragged everyone else with them. I'm a solid social historian—that is, it's larger social trends and systems that dominate history, not "great men"—but the Beatles confound that. Their talent, personality, and restless curiosity actually steered things in ways that few other artists ever could hope to do.
I have a friend that is deeply resistant to liking things just because of historical context. If they don't still play well in the current time and not sound dated, he's not interested.
That kind insularity to history, I've long thought, is a silent admission of one's own irrelevance. Unless you can somehow stay current, keeping up with trends, anything you once accomplished is garbage. It's a perspective without foundation because trend is by its very nature always evolving. It's a rather postmodern position, but one that illustrates to me what's so fundamentally horrible about postmodernism—that in rejecting standards, it rejects value of any kind because it's all utterly transitory.
I'm not sure how he'd respond to that. He's very analytical and lacking in emotion (I actually suspect he's a low-level sociopath), and I think a lot of his opinions on music and art come from what he's read and memorized (he's a medical doctor) rather than what he actually thinks (if he's even capable of coming up with his own opinions on it). I once caught him reciting program notes from a symphony we attended almost verbatim as his own opinion. The way he usually responds to stuff like the Beatles is "just because it's historically important doesn't mean it's good." Which is not wrong, I guess, but it does close his mind before he gives anything a chance.
There is no new music everything is old.
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Re: The Beatles song you're thinking about right now thread

Post by Dr. Medulla »

Kory wrote:
26 Mar 2020, 2:17pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
26 Mar 2020, 1:33pm
Kory wrote:
26 Mar 2020, 1:21pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
25 Mar 2020, 6:43pm
Marky Dread wrote:
25 Mar 2020, 6:23pm
Way too many great songs to hate a band like The Beatles. A fair few crap songs also but just too many to admire that set out a blue print for so many to follow.

I think their legendary status becomes a bit overbearing at times. You know it's The Beatles so it must be great blah blah. But some magical early pop nuggets followed by that psych period is just too good to deny.
It's just a case where the kneejerk suspicion of lazy hype actually fails the cynical. It's insane to consider how far they came in such a short period and consistently dragged everyone else with them. I'm a solid social historian—that is, it's larger social trends and systems that dominate history, not "great men"—but the Beatles confound that. Their talent, personality, and restless curiosity actually steered things in ways that few other artists ever could hope to do.
I have a friend that is deeply resistant to liking things just because of historical context. If they don't still play well in the current time and not sound dated, he's not interested.
That kind insularity to history, I've long thought, is a silent admission of one's own irrelevance. Unless you can somehow stay current, keeping up with trends, anything you once accomplished is garbage. It's a perspective without foundation because trend is by its very nature always evolving. It's a rather postmodern position, but one that illustrates to me what's so fundamentally horrible about postmodernism—that in rejecting standards, it rejects value of any kind because it's all utterly transitory.
I'm not sure how he'd respond to that. He's very analytical and lacking in emotion (I actually suspect he's a low-level sociopath), and I think a lot of his opinions on music and art come from what he's read and memorized (he's a medical doctor) rather than what he actually thinks (if he's even capable of coming up with his own opinions on it). I once caught him reciting program notes from a symphony we attended almost verbatim as his own opinion. The way he usually responds to stuff like the Beatles is "just because it's historically important doesn't mean it's good." Which is not wrong, I guess, but it does close his mind before he gives anything a chance.
He's certainly not wrong about historically important things also being good (e.g., KISS are really important in this history of popular music, but they were largely garbage), but if his key criteria is sounding contemporary, then my assessment stands. But your other comment about him suggests he quite status conscious—the anxiety that comes from how others judge are aesthetic taste—yet he's never actually developed it. So, again, there's a lack of a foundation there. It's fine if you hang out with other trendy people—no one will notice—but people whose tastes are a bit more autonomous expose them.
Back off, or I'll blow the roof off—with sound!

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Re: The Beatles song you're thinking about right now thread

Post by Kory »

Dr. Medulla wrote:
26 Mar 2020, 3:05pm
Kory wrote:
26 Mar 2020, 2:17pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
26 Mar 2020, 1:33pm
Kory wrote:
26 Mar 2020, 1:21pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
25 Mar 2020, 6:43pm


It's just a case where the kneejerk suspicion of lazy hype actually fails the cynical. It's insane to consider how far they came in such a short period and consistently dragged everyone else with them. I'm a solid social historian—that is, it's larger social trends and systems that dominate history, not "great men"—but the Beatles confound that. Their talent, personality, and restless curiosity actually steered things in ways that few other artists ever could hope to do.
I have a friend that is deeply resistant to liking things just because of historical context. If they don't still play well in the current time and not sound dated, he's not interested.
That kind insularity to history, I've long thought, is a silent admission of one's own irrelevance. Unless you can somehow stay current, keeping up with trends, anything you once accomplished is garbage. It's a perspective without foundation because trend is by its very nature always evolving. It's a rather postmodern position, but one that illustrates to me what's so fundamentally horrible about postmodernism—that in rejecting standards, it rejects value of any kind because it's all utterly transitory.
I'm not sure how he'd respond to that. He's very analytical and lacking in emotion (I actually suspect he's a low-level sociopath), and I think a lot of his opinions on music and art come from what he's read and memorized (he's a medical doctor) rather than what he actually thinks (if he's even capable of coming up with his own opinions on it). I once caught him reciting program notes from a symphony we attended almost verbatim as his own opinion. The way he usually responds to stuff like the Beatles is "just because it's historically important doesn't mean it's good." Which is not wrong, I guess, but it does close his mind before he gives anything a chance.
He's certainly not wrong about historically important things also being good (e.g., KISS are really important in this history of popular music, but they were largely garbage), but if his key criteria is sounding contemporary, then my assessment stands. But your other comment about him suggests he quite status conscious—the anxiety that comes from how others judge are aesthetic taste—yet he's never actually developed it. So, again, there's a lack of a foundation there. It's fine if you hang out with other trendy people—no one will notice—but people whose tastes are a bit more autonomous expose them.
Oh yes, one thing that I've learned about him since I met him in '96 is that his big motivator is his insecurity. He isn't winning until everyone in the room is aware of how much he "knows." Again, largely just rote memorization and recitation. Maybe a good skill for a doctor, but pretty annoying socially. Most people find him irritating as hell on first meeting, though he's a huge hit with the ladies almost universally, much to their eventual regret.
WWK: I feel confident we haven't heard the last from Dr. Harvey Camel.

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Re: The Beatles song you're thinking about right now thread

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Kory wrote:
26 Mar 2020, 3:25pm
Oh yes, one thing that I've learned about him since I met him in '96 is that his big motivator is his insecurity. He isn't winning until everyone in the room is aware of how much he "knows." Again, largely just rote memorization and recitation. Maybe a good skill for a doctor, but pretty annoying socially. Most people find him irritating as hell on first meeting, though he's a huge hit with the ladies almost universally, much to their eventual regret.
An old phrase comes to mind—deep down, he's really quite shallow. But not unusual. I've known several people like that, and they tend to be aggressive with people who regard trendiness with some skepticism because, I assume, they're a threat to their own taste-based status. So it's a bit surprising you're friends. He's an example of the significance of what the French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu described as cultural capital. Unlike regular capital—basically, money—that divides us into classes, cultural capital breaks things down with the class based on our cultural knowledge and taste. Do you prefer opera or Garth Brooks? Do you vacation in the south of France or Disneyland? It can also extend to other demographics, such as music fans. Does your music taste make you elite or a dope? So it sounds like he tries to fake his cultural capital to appear elite. Fun and sad stuff.
Back off, or I'll blow the roof off—with sound!

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Re: The Beatles song you're thinking about right now thread

Post by Kory »

Dr. Medulla wrote:
26 Mar 2020, 3:36pm
Kory wrote:
26 Mar 2020, 3:25pm
Oh yes, one thing that I've learned about him since I met him in '96 is that his big motivator is his insecurity. He isn't winning until everyone in the room is aware of how much he "knows." Again, largely just rote memorization and recitation. Maybe a good skill for a doctor, but pretty annoying socially. Most people find him irritating as hell on first meeting, though he's a huge hit with the ladies almost universally, much to their eventual regret.
An old phrase comes to mind—deep down, he's really quite shallow. But not unusual. I've known several people like that, and they tend to be aggressive with people who regard trendiness with some skepticism because, I assume, they're a threat to their own taste-based status. So it's a bit surprising you're friends. He's an example of the significance of what the French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu described as cultural capital. Unlike regular capital—basically, money—that divides us into classes, cultural capital breaks things down with the class based on our cultural knowledge and taste. Do you prefer opera or Garth Brooks? Do you vacation in the south of France or Disneyland? It can also extend to other demographics, such as music fans. Does your music taste make you elite or a dope? So it sounds like he tries to fake his cultural capital to appear elite. Fun and sad stuff.
Yeah I question it with some frequency, but we have very similar senses of humor, so I get something out of that. As long as we don't talk about art quite as much it's a decent friendship. I think he's just so analytical that he doesn't really understand what makes art good, and so relies on pre-existing opinions to use as his own because he recognizes that an understanding of art is important to being a well-rounded person. It's all fairly cynical.
WWK: I feel confident we haven't heard the last from Dr. Harvey Camel.

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Re: The Beatles song you're thinking about right now thread

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Kory wrote:
26 Mar 2020, 3:45pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
26 Mar 2020, 3:36pm
Kory wrote:
26 Mar 2020, 3:25pm
Oh yes, one thing that I've learned about him since I met him in '96 is that his big motivator is his insecurity. He isn't winning until everyone in the room is aware of how much he "knows." Again, largely just rote memorization and recitation. Maybe a good skill for a doctor, but pretty annoying socially. Most people find him irritating as hell on first meeting, though he's a huge hit with the ladies almost universally, much to their eventual regret.
An old phrase comes to mind—deep down, he's really quite shallow. But not unusual. I've known several people like that, and they tend to be aggressive with people who regard trendiness with some skepticism because, I assume, they're a threat to their own taste-based status. So it's a bit surprising you're friends. He's an example of the significance of what the French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu described as cultural capital. Unlike regular capital—basically, money—that divides us into classes, cultural capital breaks things down with the class based on our cultural knowledge and taste. Do you prefer opera or Garth Brooks? Do you vacation in the south of France or Disneyland? It can also extend to other demographics, such as music fans. Does your music taste make you elite or a dope? So it sounds like he tries to fake his cultural capital to appear elite. Fun and sad stuff.
Yeah I question it with some frequency, but we have very similar senses of humor, so I get something out of that. As long as we don't talk about art quite as much it's a decent friendship. I think he's just so analytical that he doesn't really understand what makes art good, and so relies on pre-existing opinions to use as his own because he recognizes that an understanding of art is important to being a well-rounded person. It's all fairly cynical.
Yeah, quite mercenary. Smart enough to realize that this stuff matters to other people, but not enough to either develop an authentic sense of taste or just opt out altogether.
Back off, or I'll blow the roof off—with sound!

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