Magical Mystery Tour - Side B - Round 2

MMT - Side B - Round 2

Poll ended at 08 Jan 2021, 2:36pm

"Hello, Goodbye"
4
21%
"Strawberry Fields Forever"
2
11%
"Penny Lane"
5
26%
"All You Need Is Love"
8
42%
 
Total votes: 19

Wolter
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Re: Magical Mystery Tour - Side B - Round 2

Post by Wolter »

Silent Majority wrote:
08 Jan 2021, 12:21pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
08 Jan 2021, 7:44am
Silent Majority wrote:
08 Jan 2021, 5:11am
Dr. Medulla wrote:
07 Jan 2021, 5:03pm
Silent Majority wrote:
07 Jan 2021, 2:53pm
Us punk rockers need to see off the meaningless hippie bullshit of All You Need Is Love, which is a shit, underwritten song with a message that encourages laying around on your arse not facing what's wrong with your life and the world.
That's a legit criticism and in the larger sense I agree. But using it to argue for—at least relatively so—a song about "remember how wonderful it was seeing the butcher and the grocer and the smell of flowers and food." I mean, if the standard is punk, "Penny Lane" is hardly better. How does it encourage action or critical thinking any more than AYNIL? AYNIL has an argument and a half-baked philosophy in it, but it's more than dumb nostalgia from someone who is, like, 23 years old. If you're going to critique AYNIL on those standards, apply them to PL.
PL is part of a wider re-examination and smoothening out of the British past, like the Kinks did with Village Green Preservation Society. The nostalgia doesn't mean a lot, but the feelings it inspired in the songwriters were very real and heartfelt to them. They're bleeding strawberry jam onto the page and the melody is there to express that. Put another way, Penny Lane is a sincere but misguided look at how we look back at the world that birthed us and in the intensity of that feeling - whatever the age of the songwriter - we're given one of the best tunes in 60s pop, unlike All You Need Is Love, which disguises the fact that it's nowhere musically with studio trickery and extracts from other songs.

Likewise, Penny Lane is a mood piece, not something seeking to be a definitive statement or finest hour like AYNIL (which fails at being both) and needs to be considered in its own ambitions.
That kind of argument about the lyrical context and content necessarily validates AYNIL then. Sincere, misguided, intensity of feeling—those all apply. That you say AYNIL fails as a definitive statement seems odd, tho. Any number of lazy writers use it to title books and articles about the band because it does so easily define the band. At the end of the day, I suspect all four would be comfortable saying that that title more than any other summarized the band's outlook.

(I hate being forced to advocate for AYNIL. If not for PL's syruppy presence, I'd jettison it like sharty underwear.)
Well, we come down to the entirety subjective issue of what has a good tune and well-written lyrics. I think PL does and AYNIL does not
Same, for the most part but now I’m turning on it.
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Silent Majority
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Re: Magical Mystery Tour - Side B - Round 2

Post by Silent Majority »

Wolter wrote:
08 Jan 2021, 12:33pm
Silent Majority wrote:
08 Jan 2021, 12:21pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
08 Jan 2021, 7:44am
Silent Majority wrote:
08 Jan 2021, 5:11am
Dr. Medulla wrote:
07 Jan 2021, 5:03pm


That's a legit criticism and in the larger sense I agree. But using it to argue for—at least relatively so—a song about "remember how wonderful it was seeing the butcher and the grocer and the smell of flowers and food." I mean, if the standard is punk, "Penny Lane" is hardly better. How does it encourage action or critical thinking any more than AYNIL? AYNIL has an argument and a half-baked philosophy in it, but it's more than dumb nostalgia from someone who is, like, 23 years old. If you're going to critique AYNIL on those standards, apply them to PL.
PL is part of a wider re-examination and smoothening out of the British past, like the Kinks did with Village Green Preservation Society. The nostalgia doesn't mean a lot, but the feelings it inspired in the songwriters were very real and heartfelt to them. They're bleeding strawberry jam onto the page and the melody is there to express that. Put another way, Penny Lane is a sincere but misguided look at how we look back at the world that birthed us and in the intensity of that feeling - whatever the age of the songwriter - we're given one of the best tunes in 60s pop, unlike All You Need Is Love, which disguises the fact that it's nowhere musically with studio trickery and extracts from other songs.

Likewise, Penny Lane is a mood piece, not something seeking to be a definitive statement or finest hour like AYNIL (which fails at being both) and needs to be considered in its own ambitions.
That kind of argument about the lyrical context and content necessarily validates AYNIL then. Sincere, misguided, intensity of feeling—those all apply. That you say AYNIL fails as a definitive statement seems odd, tho. Any number of lazy writers use it to title books and articles about the band because it does so easily define the band. At the end of the day, I suspect all four would be comfortable saying that that title more than any other summarized the band's outlook.

(I hate being forced to advocate for AYNIL. If not for PL's syruppy presence, I'd jettison it like sharty underwear.)
Well, we come down to the entirety subjective issue of what has a good tune and well-written lyrics. I think PL does and AYNIL does not
Same, for the most part but now I’m turning on it.
Oh yeah, SFF and Hello Goodbye have better tunes and SFF has maybe the best lyrics of any Beatles song.
Once I got to the mountain top, tell you what I could see
Prairie full of lost souls running from the priests of iniquity


www.pexlives.libsyn.com/

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