Whatcha reading?

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Kory
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Re: Whatcha reading?

Post by Kory » 11 Feb 2019, 3:46pm

Wolter wrote:
10 Feb 2019, 10:47pm
The problem here is that you heathens are reading books that aren't the divinely inspired word of God, by which I mean the King James Bible.
Who knew Wolt was going to pull a Dave Sim?
Inder:
Absolutely. Here's another collection of words:

Table salt (spoon hinge)
Octopus (Ukraine)
St. Petersburg (arms)
Ginger beer (cauliflower)
Pat Sajak (PSak)
Lamp post (self evident)
Florida Timeshare (ditto)
Heraclitus (EMI)
Developers (Developers Developers)
Boogie With Your Children

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Re: Whatcha reading?

Post by Dr. Medulla » 11 Feb 2019, 4:01pm

Kory wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 3:46pm
Wolter wrote:
10 Feb 2019, 10:47pm
The problem here is that you heathens are reading books that aren't the divinely inspired word of God, by which I mean the King James Bible.
Who knew Wolt was going to pull a Dave Sim?
Image
I'm an expert in gold mining lore!

Wolter
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Re: Whatcha reading?

Post by Wolter » 11 Feb 2019, 4:04pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 4:01pm
Kory wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 3:46pm
Wolter wrote:
10 Feb 2019, 10:47pm
The problem here is that you heathens are reading books that aren't the divinely inspired word of God, by which I mean the King James Bible.
Who knew Wolt was going to pull a Dave Sim?
Image
I’m sick of all of your Voids attempting to consume my Male Light.
”INDER LOCK THE THE KISS THREAD IVE REALISED IM A PRZE IDOOT” - Thomas Jefferson

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Re: Whatcha reading?

Post by Dr. Medulla » 11 Feb 2019, 4:13pm

Wolter wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 4:04pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 4:01pm
Kory wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 3:46pm
Wolter wrote:
10 Feb 2019, 10:47pm
The problem here is that you heathens are reading books that aren't the divinely inspired word of God, by which I mean the King James Bible.
Who knew Wolt was going to pull a Dave Sim?
Image
I’m sick of all of your Voids attempting to consume my Male Light.
Somehow misogynists who invent jargon amplify the creep factor immeasurably.
I'm an expert in gold mining lore!

Olaf
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Re: Whatcha reading?

Post by Olaf » 11 Feb 2019, 5:30pm

Note to self: don't seat Marky next to Jon Savage at the dinner table.

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Re: Whatcha reading?

Post by Marky Dread » 11 Feb 2019, 6:04pm

Olaf wrote:
11 Feb 2019, 5:30pm
Note to self: don't seat Marky next to Jon Savage at the dinner table.
That's not a problem Olaf. As sure as punk is only pub rock sped up Savage would say there was no dinner table.
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Re: Whatcha reading?

Post by Silent Majority » 13 Feb 2019, 6:35pm

7) Andrew Johnson - Annette Gordon-Reed. Kindle. Because there's so little in the way of primary sources, nobody can get close to the piece of shit white supremacist who filled Lincoln's giant shoes. It's likely that Johnson couldn't really write. The country first noticed him as an agitant for the common (white) man. Then he got pissed drunk at his inauguration where he had been chosen, as a Tennessean, to start bringing a wartorn country back together. On assuming office, he immediately set to work trying to make the South identical to how it was in 1859, minus actual chattel slavery. His choices continue to be massively awful for the country he led. The author is best known for the Hemingses of Monticello, and is witty and righteous. More an essay than an actual biography, but as much as anyone would want to read about Andy J.
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Re: Whatcha reading?

Post by Wolter » 13 Feb 2019, 7:06pm

Silent Majority wrote:
13 Feb 2019, 6:35pm
7) Andrew Johnson - Annette Gordon-Reed. Kindle. Because there's so little in the way of primary sources, nobody can get close to the piece of shit white supremacist who filled Lincoln's giant shoes. It's likely that Johnson couldn't really write. The country first noticed him as an agitant for the common (white) man. Then he got pissed drunk at his inauguration where he had been chosen, as a Tennessean, to start bringing a wartorn country back together. On assuming office, he immediately set to work trying to make the South identical to how it was in 1859, minus actual chattel slavery. His choices continue to be massively awful for the country he led. The author is best known for the Hemingses of Monticello, and is witty and righteous. More an essay than an actual biography, but as much as anyone would want to read about Andy J.
Not gonna lie: your review is about as much as I wa t to read about him.
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Re: Whatcha reading?

Post by Dr. Medulla » 13 Feb 2019, 7:11pm

Silent Majority wrote:
13 Feb 2019, 6:35pm
7) Andrew Johnson - Annette Gordon-Reed. Kindle. Because there's so little in the way of primary sources, nobody can get close to the piece of shit white supremacist who filled Lincoln's giant shoes. It's likely that Johnson couldn't really write. The country first noticed him as an agitant for the common (white) man. Then he got pissed drunk at his inauguration where he had been chosen, as a Tennessean, to start bringing a wartorn country back together. On assuming office, he immediately set to work trying to make the South identical to how it was in 1859, minus actual chattel slavery. His choices continue to be massively awful for the country he led. The author is best known for the Hemingses of Monticello, and is witty and righteous. More an essay than an actual biography, but as much as anyone would want to read about Andy J.
Really hard to come up with a worse person to inherit the office and the immediate problems than someone like Johnson. But then Lincoln was the exception to the run of absolute knaves throughout most of the nineteenth century.
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Re: Whatcha reading?

Post by Dr. Medulla » 16 Feb 2019, 9:00pm

Biking/Audio book:
Image
Mostly non-fiction pieces, but a few short stories. He's crazy, maybe a fascist—as has been discussed here before—but he's a writer of jaw-dropping power.
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tepista
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Re: Whatcha reading?

Post by tepista » 18 Feb 2019, 2:25pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
13 Feb 2019, 7:11pm
Silent Majority wrote:
13 Feb 2019, 6:35pm
7) Andrew Johnson - Annette Gordon-Reed. Kindle. Because there's so little in the way of primary sources, nobody can get close to the piece of shit white supremacist who filled Lincoln's giant shoes. It's likely that Johnson couldn't really write. The country first noticed him as an agitant for the common (white) man. Then he got pissed drunk at his inauguration where he had been chosen, as a Tennessean, to start bringing a wartorn country back together. On assuming office, he immediately set to work trying to make the South identical to how it was in 1859, minus actual chattel slavery. His choices continue to be massively awful for the country he led. The author is best known for the Hemingses of Monticello, and is witty and righteous. More an essay than an actual biography, but as much as anyone would want to read about Andy J.
Really hard to come up with a worse person to inherit the office and the immediate problems than someone like Johnson. But then Lincoln was the exception to the run of absolute knaves throughout most of the nineteenth century.
I had to look at a 20 in my wallet to make sure he wasn't on it
We reach the parts other combos cannot reach
We beach the beachheads other armies cannot beach
We speak the tongues other mouths cannot speak

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Re: Whatcha reading?

Post by Dr. Medulla » 18 Feb 2019, 2:39pm

tepista wrote:
18 Feb 2019, 2:25pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
13 Feb 2019, 7:11pm
Silent Majority wrote:
13 Feb 2019, 6:35pm
7) Andrew Johnson - Annette Gordon-Reed. Kindle. Because there's so little in the way of primary sources, nobody can get close to the piece of shit white supremacist who filled Lincoln's giant shoes. It's likely that Johnson couldn't really write. The country first noticed him as an agitant for the common (white) man. Then he got pissed drunk at his inauguration where he had been chosen, as a Tennessean, to start bringing a wartorn country back together. On assuming office, he immediately set to work trying to make the South identical to how it was in 1859, minus actual chattel slavery. His choices continue to be massively awful for the country he led. The author is best known for the Hemingses of Monticello, and is witty and righteous. More an essay than an actual biography, but as much as anyone would want to read about Andy J.
Really hard to come up with a worse person to inherit the office and the immediate problems than someone like Johnson. But then Lincoln was the exception to the run of absolute knaves throughout most of the nineteenth century.
I had to look at a 20 in my wallet to make sure he wasn't on it
Different asshole on the 20. Until Trump, Jackson might be the most loud and proud racist president you guys have had.


Also, gave up on Nehring. Not a bad book, but way to involved for tub reading. Started this today instead:
Image

I'm sure I've read this before, but it's not seeming familiar, so it's basically new to me. All hail senility!
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tepista
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Re: Whatcha reading?

Post by tepista » 18 Feb 2019, 4:59pm

Dr. Medulla wrote:
18 Feb 2019, 2:39pm
tepista wrote:
18 Feb 2019, 2:25pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
13 Feb 2019, 7:11pm
Silent Majority wrote:
13 Feb 2019, 6:35pm
7) Andrew Johnson - Annette Gordon-Reed. Kindle. Because there's so little in the way of primary sources, nobody can get close to the piece of shit white supremacist who filled Lincoln's giant shoes. It's likely that Johnson couldn't really write. The country first noticed him as an agitant for the common (white) man. Then he got pissed drunk at his inauguration where he had been chosen, as a Tennessean, to start bringing a wartorn country back together. On assuming office, he immediately set to work trying to make the South identical to how it was in 1859, minus actual chattel slavery. His choices continue to be massively awful for the country he led. The author is best known for the Hemingses of Monticello, and is witty and righteous. More an essay than an actual biography, but as much as anyone would want to read about Andy J.
Really hard to come up with a worse person to inherit the office and the immediate problems than someone like Johnson. But then Lincoln was the exception to the run of absolute knaves throughout most of the nineteenth century.
I had to look at a 20 in my wallet to make sure he wasn't on it
Different asshole on the 20. Until Trump, Jackson might be the most loud and proud racist president you guys have had.


Also, gave up on Nehring. Not a bad book, but way to involved for tub reading. Started this today instead:
Image

I'm sure I've read this before, but it's not seeming familiar, so it's basically new to me. All hail senility!
But don't you have to disregard it since the review thinks a 20 win season means something? :shifty:
We reach the parts other combos cannot reach
We beach the beachheads other armies cannot beach
We speak the tongues other mouths cannot speak

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Re: Whatcha reading?

Post by Flex » 18 Feb 2019, 5:04pm

tepista wrote:
18 Feb 2019, 4:59pm
But don't you have to disregard it since the review thinks a 20 win season means something? :shifty:
Doc is reading it so he can translate the book into spreadsheets.
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Re: Whatcha reading?

Post by Dr. Medulla » 18 Feb 2019, 5:21pm

Flex wrote:
18 Feb 2019, 5:04pm
tepista wrote:
18 Feb 2019, 4:59pm
But don't you have to disregard it since the review thinks a 20 win season means something? :shifty:
Doc is reading it so he can translate the book into spreadsheets.
I just convert to WAR. S'all good. :cool:

I finished listening to Kahn's The Era, about NY baseball in the late 40s and 50s. Fantastic fun stuff. But it came out in the early 90s and has some observations about modern baseball that haven't aged well.
Some argue that baseball today, circa 1993, is better than ever. George Will, in the popular 1990 book Men at Work, declares that “things are better than ever . . . in baseball” and that talk about a “Golden Age” is “piffle.” Even if one resists the temptation to dismiss Will as an arriviste, it is difficult to agree with his conclusion.

It is true, to be sure, that many things today are better than ever: color television sets, ball gloves, thermonuclear bombs, Olympic long jumpers, high blood pressure pills, tennis rackets, jet fighter planes, and sneakers. But many things are not better than ever: epic poems, violins, presidents, concert halls, blondes, plays about royalty, and — to put a point on this — managers and ballplayers.

Indeed, many things are demonstrably worse. AstroTurf is a poorer playing surface than grass. AstroTurf has given baseball the trampoline bounce and the ground ball triple. Multisport stadia, those vast concrete coffee cups in Cincinnati, Pittsburgh, and elsewhere, are worse than the old ballparks; they are not even designed specifically for baseball.

Generally the rich players of today are less driven to win than the forever hungry players who grew out of the Depression. Although one finds exceptions, today’s ballplayer is more the pampered house cat and less the tiger focused on the hunt.

Aren’t today’s athletes faster, bigger, and stronger than their counterparts of the 1950s? Certainly that applies to football players, runners, and Olympic basketball stars. But baseball is not a faster-bigger-stronger game. Given a certain minimum standard, major league baseball is timing, coordination, and hand-to-eye response. Jim Thorpe, the strongest, fastest athlete of his time, was a bust as a big leaguer. For all his strength and speed, Big Jim could not hit major league curve balls.

The best recent big league shortstop has been Osborne Earl Smith, called Ozzie, who stands five foot ten and weighs 150 pounds. That is 10 pounds less than the playing weight of Harold Henry Reese, called Pee Wee, the Hall of Fame shortstop from the Era. (Are great fielding shortstops actually getting smaller?)

The strongest contemporary power hitter probably is Jose Canseco, who stands a formidable six foot four. But neither Canseco nor other large present sluggers, such as Mark McGwire (six foot five) and Cecil Fielder (250 pounds), hit for distance to match Mickey Mantle, who stands five foot eleven and played at 190 pounds. (Are great sluggers growing bigger . . . and weaker?)

An electronic timing device clocked balls fired by the Dodgers’ Joe Black at 96 miles an hour one night in 1952. “Allie Reynolds,” Black says, “was faster than me. When he was pushing it, he got up over one hundred.” Reynolds was big, but no giant, at six feet, 195 pounds. Many pitchers today are bigger. None throws faster.

The skills of managers are harder to quantify. Durocher was matchless across pennant races, keeping his players furious, focused, and sullen yet not mutinous.

As Yankee manager, Stengel practiced necromancy. I don’t believe you can say that about any baseball manager today.
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