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Re: movies

Post by revbob »

Flex wrote:
22 Nov 2022, 1:12am
Watching Alice's Restaurant again for Thanksgiving holiday time. What a brilliant film. I love it more every time. It retains the humoress anti-war elements of the original but bakes it into a elegaic collapse of the 60s counterculture. But there's a lot of compassion towards everyone in the film too, which gives it an essential sweetness despite its melancholy.
So the movie is better than the song?

Maybe I just have bad memories of that song and old hippie DJs going on about how great a song it was.

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Re: movies

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revbob wrote:
22 Nov 2022, 1:37am
Flex wrote:
22 Nov 2022, 1:12am
Watching Alice's Restaurant again for Thanksgiving holiday time. What a brilliant film. I love it more every time. It retains the humoress anti-war elements of the original but bakes it into a elegaic collapse of the 60s counterculture. But there's a lot of compassion towards everyone in the film too, which gives it an essential sweetness despite its melancholy.
So the movie is better than the song?

Maybe I just have bad memories of that song and old hippie DJs going on about how great a song it was.
I love the song—one of the great anti-war pieces—but the movie dragged for me. Tho it's been awhile since I watched it last.
"And so the sailor goes, 'I don’t know, but it’s driving me nuts!'” - Woodrow Wilson to David Lloyd George, Paris Peace Conference, 1 February 1919

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Re: movies

Post by revbob »

Dr. Medulla wrote:
22 Nov 2022, 7:22am
revbob wrote:
22 Nov 2022, 1:37am
Flex wrote:
22 Nov 2022, 1:12am
Watching Alice's Restaurant again for Thanksgiving holiday time. What a brilliant film. I love it more every time. It retains the humoress anti-war elements of the original but bakes it into a elegaic collapse of the 60s counterculture. But there's a lot of compassion towards everyone in the film too, which gives it an essential sweetness despite its melancholy.
So the movie is better than the song?

Maybe I just have bad memories of that song and old hippie DJs going on about how great a song it was.
I love the song—one of the great anti-war pieces—but the movie dragged for me. Tho it's been awhile since I watched it last.
I appreciate the spirit of the song just not the length of it.

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Re: movies

Post by Dr. Medulla »

revbob wrote:
22 Nov 2022, 8:47am
Dr. Medulla wrote:
22 Nov 2022, 7:22am
revbob wrote:
22 Nov 2022, 1:37am
Flex wrote:
22 Nov 2022, 1:12am
Watching Alice's Restaurant again for Thanksgiving holiday time. What a brilliant film. I love it more every time. It retains the humoress anti-war elements of the original but bakes it into a elegaic collapse of the 60s counterculture. But there's a lot of compassion towards everyone in the film too, which gives it an essential sweetness despite its melancholy.
So the movie is better than the song?

Maybe I just have bad memories of that song and old hippie DJs going on about how great a song it was.
I love the song—one of the great anti-war pieces—but the movie dragged for me. Tho it's been awhile since I watched it last.
I appreciate the spirit of the song just not the length of it.
The length produces one of the best jokes in it—"You remember Alice? This is a song about Alice." I've used that line in class when I get off on a tangent then remember, "Oh shit, right, I'm supposed to follow my notes."
"And so the sailor goes, 'I don’t know, but it’s driving me nuts!'” - Woodrow Wilson to David Lloyd George, Paris Peace Conference, 1 February 1919

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Re: movies

Post by Flex »

Dr. Medulla wrote:
22 Nov 2022, 7:22am
revbob wrote:
22 Nov 2022, 1:37am
So the movie is better than the song?

Maybe I just have bad memories of that song and old hippie DJs going on about how great a song it was.
I love the song—one of the great anti-war pieces—but the movie dragged for me. Tho it's been awhile since I watched it last.
Yeah, the song rules. If you don't like it already, you're not gonna care for the 1:50 film adaptation of it.

It's a bit of a shaggy dog movie, as is fitting an adaptation of the song, but stuff added in is a LOT more about the death of 60s counterculture through some soapy melodrama surrounding Alice, her husband, and the hippie commune that they're running and how it lives (or fails to live) up to the egalitarian ideal. There's also a subplot with Arlo grappling with the impending death of his father, himself a representative of an almost dead & buried leftist, anti-fascist movement, which is both personal and resonant with bigger themes of the passage of these reactions to dominant culture.

It's definitely a mellow film - filled with people actually playing themselves, most famously officer obie, and quirky asides and quieter moments - but it really strikes a melancholic chord that I think is a) a compelling watch, b) very historically interesting, and c) a good film to watch around thanksgiving that taps into a more somber assessment of american character that is fitting for the holiday.

And, as I said, it doesn't particularly indict anyone for their personal or social failures. There's a respect given to all the characters on screen (even a couple characters, like Alice's husband, who may or may not really deserve it) which I think is very humane.

Addendum: the director was Arthur Penn who of course covered some similar thematic territory with his 1967 movie Bonnie & Clyde. Great director, I think he actually got an oscar nomination for Alice's Restaurant.
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Re: movies

Post by Dr. Medulla »

Flex wrote:
22 Nov 2022, 12:51pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
22 Nov 2022, 7:22am
revbob wrote:
22 Nov 2022, 1:37am
So the movie is better than the song?

Maybe I just have bad memories of that song and old hippie DJs going on about how great a song it was.
I love the song—one of the great anti-war pieces—but the movie dragged for me. Tho it's been awhile since I watched it last.
Yeah, the song rules. If you don't like it already, you're not gonna care for the 1:50 film adaptation of it.

It's a bit of a shaggy dog movie, as is fitting an adaptation of the song, but stuff added in is a LOT more about the death of 60s counterculture through some soapy melodrama surrounding Alice, her husband, and the hippie commune that they're running and how it lives (or fails to live) up to the egalitarian ideal. There's also a subplot with Arlo grappling with the impending death of his father, himself a representative of an almost dead & buried leftist, anti-fascist movement, which is both personal and resonant with bigger themes of the passage of these reactions to dominant culture.

It's definitely a mellow film - filled with people actually playing themselves, most famously officer obie, and quirky asides and quieter moments - but it really strikes a melancholic chord that I think is a) a compelling watch, b) very historically interesting, and c) a good film to watch around thanksgiving that taps into a more somber assessment of american character that is fitting for the holiday.

And, as I said, it doesn't particularly indict anyone for their personal or social failures. There's a respect given to all the characters on screen (even a couple characters, like Alice's husband, who may or may not really deserve it) which I think is very humane.
Damn, man, you really make me want to watch it now. The Boss is going to be occupied with work this weekend, so I might be able to claim the tv then.
"And so the sailor goes, 'I don’t know, but it’s driving me nuts!'” - Woodrow Wilson to David Lloyd George, Paris Peace Conference, 1 February 1919

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Re: movies

Post by Flex »

Dr. Medulla wrote:
22 Nov 2022, 12:53pm
Damn, man, you really make me want to watch it now. The Boss is going to be occupied with work this weekend, so I might be able to claim the tv then.
Yeah, I'd definitely urge a rewatch. I think the first time I saw it however many years ago I fell asleep partway through the movie, ha. So I understand your recollection of it. It's one of those films I've rewatched every few years or so and let worm into my brain, and the last couple times I watched it I've really, really dug it so it may just be a case of giving it another shot.
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Re: movies

Post by Dr. Medulla »

Flex wrote:
22 Nov 2022, 12:57pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
22 Nov 2022, 12:53pm
Damn, man, you really make me want to watch it now. The Boss is going to be occupied with work this weekend, so I might be able to claim the tv then.
Yeah, I'd definitely urge a rewatch. I think the first time I saw it however many years ago I fell asleep partway through the movie, ha. So I understand your recollection of it. It's one of those films I've rewatched every few years or so and let worm into my brain, and the last couple times I watched it I've really, really dug it so it may just be a case of giving it another shot.
I suspect my meh opinion from when I first watched it was an expectation of more humour (like the song), rather than, as you state, something mellow and melancholy. But my greater appreciation for the collapse of the countercultural dream in recent years should make me a better audience now.
"And so the sailor goes, 'I don’t know, but it’s driving me nuts!'” - Woodrow Wilson to David Lloyd George, Paris Peace Conference, 1 February 1919

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Re: movies

Post by Sparky »

Flex wrote:
22 Nov 2022, 12:51pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
22 Nov 2022, 7:22am
revbob wrote:
22 Nov 2022, 1:37am
So the movie is better than the song?

Maybe I just have bad memories of that song and old hippie DJs going on about how great a song it was.
I love the song—one of the great anti-war pieces—but the movie dragged for me. Tho it's been awhile since I watched it last.
Yeah, the song rules. If you don't like it already, you're not gonna care for the 1:50 film adaptation of it.

It's a bit of a shaggy dog movie, as is fitting an adaptation of the song, but stuff added in is a LOT more about the death of 60s counterculture through some soapy melodrama surrounding Alice, her husband, and the hippie commune that they're running and how it lives (or fails to live) up to the egalitarian ideal. There's also a subplot with Arlo grappling with the impending death of his father, himself a representative of an almost dead & buried leftist, anti-fascist movement, which is both personal and resonant with bigger themes of the passage of these reactions to dominant culture.

It's definitely a mellow film - filled with people actually playing themselves, most famously officer obie, and quirky asides and quieter moments - but it really strikes a melancholic chord that I think is a) a compelling watch, b) very historically interesting, and c) a good film to watch around thanksgiving that taps into a more somber assessment of american character that is fitting for the holiday.

And, as I said, it doesn't particularly indict anyone for their personal or social failures. There's a respect given to all the characters on screen (even a couple characters, like Alice's husband, who may or may not really deserve it) which I think is very humane.

Addendum: the director was Arthur Penn who of course covered some similar thematic territory with his 1967 movie Bonnie & Clyde. Great director, I think he actually got an oscar nomination for Alice's Restaurant.
I like the song, though it is a bit long, but the way Arlo tells the tale just makes it work for me. Haven't seen the movie, but I may have to watch it on YT this holiday weekend.

***Edit - didn't know the link was protected when imbedded, but you can still follow to watch on YT***

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Re: movies

Post by Flex »

tepista wrote:
05 Dec 2018, 9:35pm
Blood Rage (1987) A young boy commits an axe murder at a Drive-In theater and pins the crime on his twin brother, who went into shock at the sight of it. 10 years later, the timid Todd (who combs his hair forward) realizes he’s been duped and escapes from the asylum. Terry (who combs his hair back) takes this opportunity to brutally murder all his friends for some reason. Some laughably bad acting (in fact, the psychologist was such a bad actress, that they dubbed another actress over her to narrate what she was saying) However, this one had some ultra-graphic kills in it, and some nudity too. Louise Lasser was top billed as the mom, but spent most of the film getting drunk and arguing with a telephone operator. Look for Ted Raimi in it too, for about 10 seconds.
I watched this last night and LOVED it. Nice restoration from Arrow video. Great pulsing soundtrack. I thought Louise Lasser actually did a great job portraying a descent into maternal insanity. Really fun gore and amazing likes. THAT'S NOT CRANBERRY SAUCE. This will be a regular Thanksgiving watch for me from now on.

My Thanksgiving movies/specials watchlist (in no particular order)

Horror movies:
1. Blood Rage (new addition)
2. Pilgrim (really darkly funny entry in Hulu's Into The Dark series, about a family that hires pilgrim reenactors to teach a lesson about gratitude and things, of course, take a bloody turn. The wife and I both enjoy this one)
3. Flesh & Blood (The other Into The Dark entry, I actually don't like this one as much and don't really revisit it, but worth mentioning)

Other movies:
2. Planes, Trains and Automobiles (I mean, duh)
3. The Last Waltz (perfect to toss on after football is finally over and you're deep into the wine, beer and pie haze)
4. Alice's Restaurant (discussion upthread)

Animated specials
5. A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving (the weakest of the charlie brown holiday specials, but some fun scenes and of course an excellent Guaraldi score)
6. Garfield's Thanksgiving (the sneaky-best of the animated specials, very sweet and heartfelt and the catchy tunes you expect from from 80s Garfield specials)
7. The Mouse on the Mayflower (I love this animated special from Rankin/Bass even though it is objectively Not Good. Tennessee Ernie Ford sings the songs! It's super dated now. Hard to find. I think the "Rankin/Bass historian" keeps filing DMCA takedown requests when it gets loaded onto youtubeso he can keep selling his own bootleg DVDs on Etsy, lol)
8. The Thanksgiving That Almost Wasn't (moldy Hanna/Barbera saturday morning grade special. Fun to toss on in the background while doing house prep for the holiday or something)
9. Charlie Brown's Mayflower Voyages (an odd duck, this was part of a series that the Peanuts folk did about American history. Kinda dull. Wouldn't really include this but it always plays right after A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving these days so I just watch it after because I'm lazy)

I know there are a few other thanksgiving-set horror movies that I'd like to check out, but that's sort of what my go-to arsenal has become to date.
In the words of Jean-Paul Sartre: "Au revoir, gopher."

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Re: movies

Post by tepista »

Flex wrote:
23 Nov 2022, 2:05pm
tepista wrote:
05 Dec 2018, 9:35pm
Blood Rage (1987) A young boy commits an axe murder at a Drive-In theater and pins the crime on his twin brother, who went into shock at the sight of it. 10 years later, the timid Todd (who combs his hair forward) realizes he’s been duped and escapes from the asylum. Terry (who combs his hair back) takes this opportunity to brutally murder all his friends for some reason. Some laughably bad acting (in fact, the psychologist was such a bad actress, that they dubbed another actress over her to narrate what she was saying) However, this one had some ultra-graphic kills in it, and some nudity too. Louise Lasser was top billed as the mom, but spent most of the film getting drunk and arguing with a telephone operator. Look for Ted Raimi in it too, for about 10 seconds.
I watched this last night and LOVED it. Nice restoration from Arrow video. Great pulsing soundtrack. I thought Louise Lasser actually did a great job portraying a descent into maternal insanity. Really fun gore and amazing likes. THAT'S NOT CRANBERRY SAUCE. This will be a regular Thanksgiving watch for me from now on.

My Thanksgiving movies/specials watchlist (in no particular order)

Horror movies:
1. Blood Rage (new addition)
2. Pilgrim (really darkly funny entry in Hulu's Into The Dark series, about a family that hires pilgrim reenactors to teach a lesson about gratitude and things, of course, take a bloody turn. The wife and I both enjoy this one)
3. Flesh & Blood (The other Into The Dark entry, I actually don't like this one as much and don't really revisit it, but worth mentioning)

Other movies:
2. Planes, Trains and Automobiles (I mean, duh)
3. The Last Waltz (perfect to toss on after football is finally over and you're deep into the wine, beer and pie haze)
4. Alice's Restaurant (discussion upthread)

Animated specials
5. A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving (the weakest of the charlie brown holiday specials, but some fun scenes and of course an excellent Guaraldi score)
6. Garfield's Thanksgiving (the sneaky-best of the animated specials, very sweet and heartfelt and the catchy tunes you expect from from 80s Garfield specials)
7. The Mouse on the Mayflower (I love this animated special from Rankin/Bass even though it is objectively Not Good. Tennessee Ernie Ford sings the songs! It's super dated now. Hard to find. I think the "Rankin/Bass historian" keeps filing DMCA takedown requests when it gets loaded onto youtubeso he can keep selling his own bootleg DVDs on Etsy, lol)
8. The Thanksgiving That Almost Wasn't (moldy Hanna/Barbera saturday morning grade special. Fun to toss on in the background while doing house prep for the holiday or something)
9. Charlie Brown's Mayflower Voyages (an odd duck, this was part of a series that the Peanuts folk did about American history. Kinda dull. Wouldn't really include this but it always plays right after A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving these days so I just watch it after because I'm lazy)

I know there are a few other thanksgiving-set horror movies that I'd like to check out, but that's sort of what my go-to arsenal has become to date.
Pilgrim was what made me aware of Into the Dark, I went back and watched everyone, and anxiously awaited the rest, even though most were mediocre at best! Too bad it's not still on, I think it was a covid casualty.

best TG horror:

Blood Freak (1972) Dept. of So-Bad-It’s-Good. Ultra low budget with some of the worst acting you’ve ever seen. This is a pro-jesus, anti-drug propaganda movie with gore and even some brief nudity. A motorcycle guy gets to choose between two pretty sisters, one druggy, one churchy, and he ends up going with the bad girl. One puff on a marijuana cigarette and he’s having heroin type withdrawals. He goes to work, where he tests a hormone-laced turkey, and the drug combo makes his head transform into a turkey head. His girlfriend ponders what their children would look like, and I’m pretty sure that scene was not meant to be funny. Since he can no longer smoke pot with his turkey beak, he must now find drug users and drain them of their doped up blood to relieve his fix. One guy gets his leg sawed off on a table saw, and I’m quite sure the actor was an amputee, as it was a fantastic effect. (one standout moment in an otherwise ridiculous flick) All the while, there is a narrator who pops in and out, cigarette in hand and gives a little jesus preaching, and during his final appearance, he gets a severe case of smokers cough, and this movie was too damn cheap to edit it!

Haha, I always roll my eyes at people who call out bad acting in horror, and here I've done it twice! Maybe there's a Thanksgiving exemption.
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Re: movies

Post by revbob »

tepista wrote:
24 Nov 2022, 10:46am
...
Blood Freak (1972) Dept. of So-Bad-It’s-Good. Ultra low budget with some of the worst acting you’ve ever seen. This is a pro-jesus, anti-drug propaganda movie with gore and even some brief nudity. A motorcycle guy gets to choose between two pretty sisters, one druggy, one churchy, and he ends up going with the bad girl. One puff on a marijuana cigarette and he’s having heroin type withdrawals. He goes to work, where he tests a hormone-laced turkey, and the drug combo makes his head transform into a turkey head. His girlfriend ponders what their children would look like, and I’m pretty sure that scene was not meant to be funny. Since he can no longer smoke pot with his turkey beak, he must now find drug users and drain them of their doped up blood to relieve his fix. One guy gets his leg sawed off on a table saw, and I’m quite sure the actor was an amputee, as it was a fantastic effect. (one standout moment in an otherwise ridiculous flick) All the while, there is a narrator who pops in and out, cigarette in hand and gives a little jesus preaching, and during his final appearance, he gets a severe case of smokers cough, and this movie was too damn cheap to edit it!

Haha, I always roll my eyes at people who call out bad acting in horror, and here I've done it twice! Maybe there's a Thanksgiving exemption.
Sounds like a Jack Chic production.

We watched I Don't Feel at Home i the World Anymore.. Found it pretty entertaining. Not horror in case anyone was wondering. Im also bad at writing reviews.

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Re: movies

Post by tepista »

revbob wrote:
24 Nov 2022, 10:57am

Sounds like a Jack Chic production.
yes, very much. Here's a head scratching clip that begs the question "why didn't you do a second take?" Skip to 1:10 if you're impatient ;)

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Re: movies

Post by Dr. Medulla »

Watched Alice's Restaurant this morning. Still not sold on it, largely because it is so disjointed and no sense of direction. Which might be the purpose and point, but the open-endedness of the narrative—where it begins, where it ends, what happens in-between—produces a "so what?" response in me. Does it matter that these people have kinda sorta dropped out and that their separateness produces, at best, mixed happiness? Who's to blame? Is it them? Is it the dominant society or Vietnam? It's just unsatisfyingly murky to me. It's suggestive that what these kids are trying to do isn't a way forward, but there's not much to be learned from their experience.
"And so the sailor goes, 'I don’t know, but it’s driving me nuts!'” - Woodrow Wilson to David Lloyd George, Paris Peace Conference, 1 February 1919

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