The Future of the Republican Party

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Dr. Medulla
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Re: The Future of the Republican Party

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revbob wrote:
13 Nov 2022, 12:08pm
Flex wrote:
12 Nov 2022, 11:39pm
lmao, suck it mcconnell
I wish this could be enough. Even if they win Georgia Manchin and Sinema will continue to handcuff progress in the Senate.
With two years to her seat being up for election, I wonder if Sinema tries to pivot toward the left to save her hide. Otherwise, you have to assume she'll get primaried. Which is to say, how motivated by principle is she versus doing whatever it takes to be re-elected?
"And so the sailor goes, 'I don’t know, but it’s driving me nuts!'” - Woodrow Wilson to David Lloyd George, Paris Peace Conference, 1 February 1919

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Re: The Future of the Republican Party

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WestwayKid wrote:
13 Nov 2022, 4:34pm
Kory wrote:
12 Nov 2022, 3:15pm
JennyB wrote:
11 Nov 2022, 2:24pm
Flex wrote:
10 Nov 2022, 7:45pm
For people looking into Colorado from the outside, winning CO-03 as a Dem is basically like when Doug Jones won in Alabama. That took running against an actual pedophile to pull off. Boebert being a vile, useless ethno-nationalist just (almost certainly) isn't enough. But in the newly created right- leaning CO-08 - which encompasses parts of northern Colorado which wanted to cecede from the state a few years ago because Colorado was getting too liberal - the democrat in that race just punched the DeSantis-esque Republican in the mouth (proverbially) - and in CO-07 the democray absolutely ran away with a race people were expecting to at least be close. Just as some context.
Yeah. People who live outside of Colorado don't know just how right wing/libertarian places outside of Denver/Boulder can be.
I find most states to be like this. Even WA is hideously rightwing once you leave Seattle city limits.
I saw several people questioning how Wisconsin re-elected our Democratic governor because "the map is all red" - I guess showing they don't understand that land doesn't vote.
Exactly, same thing applies with the truck and boat parades, trucks and boats didn't vote, people did and that's that.
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Dr. Medulla
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Re: The Future of the Republican Party

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An observation: I'm a bit surprised at how much the election-deniers have folded in the face of their own losses, when there was a fear that this would be a near-unified narrative—if a Republican lost, it was a stolen election. It's suggestive, I think, of how much the Trump playbook needs the man to make it work. Other people lack the commitment or shamelessness to stick with the con all the way thru. Which is a good thing, of course.
"And so the sailor goes, 'I don’t know, but it’s driving me nuts!'” - Woodrow Wilson to David Lloyd George, Paris Peace Conference, 1 February 1919

msza2
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Re: The Future of the Republican Party

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Dr. Medulla wrote:
14 Nov 2022, 8:53am
An observation: I'm a bit surprised at how much the election-deniers have folded in the face of their own losses, when there was a fear that this would be a near-unified narrative—if a Republican lost, it was a stolen election. It's suggestive, I think, of how much the Trump playbook needs the man to make it work. Other people lack the commitment or shamelessness to stick with the con all the way thru. Which is a good thing, of course.
Yeah, it has been interesting to watch. Though when I think about it, the pattern tends to be:

1. Something happens
2. Most Republicans respond like normal people
3. Trump responds like a stark raving random conspiracy generator
4. Trump's 30% latch onto a conspiracy or two
5 Republicans have a think and then follow their voters onto the crazy train

I wonder if any of these failed MAGA candidates won't hesitate to renege their concessions in the face of "new evidence" if at any point any of Trump's fraud conspiracies reach a critical mass of acceptance with dimmest 30% of the country. To your point, it's all centered around the guy insane enough to steal nuclear secret in broad daylight.

Dr. Medulla
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Re: The Future of the Republican Party

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msza2 wrote:
14 Nov 2022, 12:45pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
14 Nov 2022, 8:53am
An observation: I'm a bit surprised at how much the election-deniers have folded in the face of their own losses, when there was a fear that this would be a near-unified narrative—if a Republican lost, it was a stolen election. It's suggestive, I think, of how much the Trump playbook needs the man to make it work. Other people lack the commitment or shamelessness to stick with the con all the way thru. Which is a good thing, of course.
Yeah, it has been interesting to watch. Though when I think about it, the pattern tends to be:

1. Something happens
2. Most Republicans respond like normal people
3. Trump responds like a stark raving random conspiracy generator
4. Trump's 30% latch onto a conspiracy or two
5 Republicans have a think and then follow their voters onto the crazy train

I wonder if any of these failed MAGA candidates won't hesitate to renege their concessions in the face of "new evidence" if at any point any of Trump's fraud conspiracies reach a critical mass of acceptance with dimmest 30% of the country. To your point, it's all centered around the guy insane enough to steal nuclear secret in broad daylight.
That's an interesting point. So if Trump had reacted on Tuesday night by going on Pravda to yell rigged, stolen, fake, maybe his candidates would been emboldened to follow his lead. But he didn't do that because he couldn't bear the thought of being attached in any way to a bunch of losers in his eyes. Funny how his obsessions and neuroses play out.
"And so the sailor goes, 'I don’t know, but it’s driving me nuts!'” - Woodrow Wilson to David Lloyd George, Paris Peace Conference, 1 February 1919

msza2
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Re: The Future of the Republican Party

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Dr. Medulla wrote:
14 Nov 2022, 1:01pm
msza2 wrote:
14 Nov 2022, 12:45pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
14 Nov 2022, 8:53am
An observation: I'm a bit surprised at how much the election-deniers have folded in the face of their own losses, when there was a fear that this would be a near-unified narrative—if a Republican lost, it was a stolen election. It's suggestive, I think, of how much the Trump playbook needs the man to make it work. Other people lack the commitment or shamelessness to stick with the con all the way thru. Which is a good thing, of course.
Yeah, it has been interesting to watch. Though when I think about it, the pattern tends to be:

1. Something happens
2. Most Republicans respond like normal people
3. Trump responds like a stark raving random conspiracy generator
4. Trump's 30% latch onto a conspiracy or two
5 Republicans have a think and then follow their voters onto the crazy train

I wonder if any of these failed MAGA candidates won't hesitate to renege their concessions in the face of "new evidence" if at any point any of Trump's fraud conspiracies reach a critical mass of acceptance with dimmest 30% of the country. To your point, it's all centered around the guy insane enough to steal nuclear secret in broad daylight.
That's an interesting point. So if Trump had reacted on Tuesday night by going on Pravda to yell rigged, stolen, fake, maybe his candidates would been emboldened to follow his lead. But he didn't do that because he couldn't bear the thought of being attached in any way to a bunch of losers in his eyes. Funny how his obsessions and neuroses play out.
Haha. Or perhaps unlike his own race he thought his candidates might actually win so he didn't think he needed to be out there stumping for fraud on election night.

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Re: The Future of the Republican Party

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Dr. Medulla wrote:
14 Nov 2022, 8:53am
An observation: I'm a bit surprised at how much the election-deniers have folded in the face of their own losses, when there was a fear that this would be a near-unified narrative—if a Republican lost, it was a stolen election. It's suggestive, I think, of how much the Trump playbook needs the man to make it work. Other people lack the commitment or shamelessness to stick with the con all the way thru. Which is a good thing, of course.
msza2 wrote:
14 Nov 2022, 12:45pm
I agree with both Doc & msza2, I was very surprised and pleased as well that the losing red candidates opted to take the high road and concede the races they lost. Call me naive or I'd prefer an optimist, but my hope is that they had seen the negative reactions to "the big lie" and didn't want to add their names to the list of those us rational people despise. By conceding their loses, there's a chance that in the future they could run again without the stain of having been a part of the "big lie".
Sittin' at home, and I'm so excited
Goin' to the party though we weren't invited

Dr. Medulla
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Re: The Future of the Republican Party

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Sparky wrote:
14 Nov 2022, 7:14pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
14 Nov 2022, 8:53am
An observation: I'm a bit surprised at how much the election-deniers have folded in the face of their own losses, when there was a fear that this would be a near-unified narrative—if a Republican lost, it was a stolen election. It's suggestive, I think, of how much the Trump playbook needs the man to make it work. Other people lack the commitment or shamelessness to stick with the con all the way thru. Which is a good thing, of course.
msza2 wrote:
14 Nov 2022, 12:45pm
I agree with both Doc & msza2, I was very surprised and pleased as well that the losing red candidates opted to take the high road and concede the races they lost. Call me naive or I'd prefer an optimist, but my hope is that they had seen the negative reactions to "the big lie" and didn't want to add their names to the list of those us rational people despise. By conceding their loses, there's a chance that in the future they could run again without the stain of having been a part of the "big lie".
To be clear, I don't think they took the high road or saw the light. I think they lacked the conviction or sufficient delusion to see thru the grift to the very end. They're still terrible people because worked a fundamentally anti-democratic angle for a long time and should be dumped into an active volcano.
"And so the sailor goes, 'I don’t know, but it’s driving me nuts!'” - Woodrow Wilson to David Lloyd George, Paris Peace Conference, 1 February 1919

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Re: The Future of the Republican Party

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Dr. Medulla wrote:
14 Nov 2022, 8:31pm
Sparky wrote:
14 Nov 2022, 7:14pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
14 Nov 2022, 8:53am
An observation: I'm a bit surprised at how much the election-deniers have folded in the face of their own losses, when there was a fear that this would be a near-unified narrative—if a Republican lost, it was a stolen election. It's suggestive, I think, of how much the Trump playbook needs the man to make it work. Other people lack the commitment or shamelessness to stick with the con all the way thru. Which is a good thing, of course.
msza2 wrote:
14 Nov 2022, 12:45pm
I agree with both Doc & msza2, I was very surprised and pleased as well that the losing red candidates opted to take the high road and concede the races they lost. Call me naive or I'd prefer an optimist, but my hope is that they had seen the negative reactions to "the big lie" and didn't want to add their names to the list of those us rational people despise. By conceding their loses, there's a chance that in the future they could run again without the stain of having been a part of the "big lie".
To be clear, I don't think they took the high road or saw the light. I think they lacked the conviction or sufficient delusion to see thru the grift to the very end. They're still terrible people because worked a fundamentally anti-democratic angle for a long time and should be dumped into an active volcano.
I would agree with that as well, I think deep down inside the majority know the big lie is BS, but nobody likes to admit they're wrong. Being able to admit defeat is really a test of character and integrity, I told a local candidate who came knocking at our door that a little while back, he look confused. Unfortunately they don't appear to make big boy pants that fit tRump supporters.
Sittin' at home, and I'm so excited
Goin' to the party though we weren't invited

Dr. Medulla
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Re: The Future of the Republican Party

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Sparky wrote:
14 Nov 2022, 8:59pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
14 Nov 2022, 8:31pm
Sparky wrote:
14 Nov 2022, 7:14pm
Dr. Medulla wrote:
14 Nov 2022, 8:53am
An observation: I'm a bit surprised at how much the election-deniers have folded in the face of their own losses, when there was a fear that this would be a near-unified narrative—if a Republican lost, it was a stolen election. It's suggestive, I think, of how much the Trump playbook needs the man to make it work. Other people lack the commitment or shamelessness to stick with the con all the way thru. Which is a good thing, of course.
msza2 wrote:
14 Nov 2022, 12:45pm
I agree with both Doc & msza2, I was very surprised and pleased as well that the losing red candidates opted to take the high road and concede the races they lost. Call me naive or I'd prefer an optimist, but my hope is that they had seen the negative reactions to "the big lie" and didn't want to add their names to the list of those us rational people despise. By conceding their loses, there's a chance that in the future they could run again without the stain of having been a part of the "big lie".
To be clear, I don't think they took the high road or saw the light. I think they lacked the conviction or sufficient delusion to see thru the grift to the very end. They're still terrible people because worked a fundamentally anti-democratic angle for a long time and should be dumped into an active volcano.
I would agree with that as well, I think deep down inside the majority know the big lie is BS, but nobody likes to admit they're wrong. Being able to admit defeat is really a test of character and integrity, I told a local candidate who came knocking at our door that a little while back, he look confused. Unfortunately they don't appear to make big boy pants that fit tRump supporters.
I regularly come back to something David Frum (ugh, I know) wrote a few years back: "If conservatives become convinced that they can not win democratically, they will not abandon conservatism. They will reject democracy." That's the test at work.
"And so the sailor goes, 'I don’t know, but it’s driving me nuts!'” - Woodrow Wilson to David Lloyd George, Paris Peace Conference, 1 February 1919

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Re: The Future of the Republican Party

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Dr. Medulla
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Re: The Future of the Republican Party

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Mimi wrote:
15 Nov 2022, 8:34am
I'm so glad she lost.

https://news.yahoo.com/greatest-self-ow ... 12781.html
What is also quite pleasing is that they aren't blaming liberals or the Deep State so much (tho those nasty single women have been cited, providing further evidence of the link between incels and the contemporary right) but instead are turning on each other. It's circular firing squad time, and don't stop shooting until you can't!
"And so the sailor goes, 'I don’t know, but it’s driving me nuts!'” - Woodrow Wilson to David Lloyd George, Paris Peace Conference, 1 February 1919

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Re: The Future of the Republican Party

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Mimi wrote:
15 Nov 2022, 8:34am
I'm so glad she lost.

https://news.yahoo.com/greatest-self-ow ... 12781.html
Just reading the yahoo news link, looks like KL posted on her Twitter account "Arizona knows BS when they see it", to which someone replied with this:

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Re: The Future of the Republican Party

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All over but the crying (and a mandatory recount that won't change the outcome) in CO-3 after the ballot cure and remaining overseas ballots are now tabulated. Ah, well. Fuck of a lot closer than I (or anyone) thought it would be. Will Boebert learn anything? Not likely. Will the seat be competitive again in two years? Who knows, but I'm sure it'll get serious support next time around.

On the upside, Boebert's continued presence more or less keeps trump's presence lashed to the neck of the colorado democratic party.

500-ish vote difference. That's crazy-small for a seat like that.
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Dr. Medulla
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Re: The Future of the Republican Party

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She will treat it as being tested by god and her faith rewarded. And so she will stride forth boldly to demand to see the contents of Hunter Biden's laptop, or any laptop supposedly own by him. And then she will open that laptop and her face will melt off like at the end of Raiders.
"And so the sailor goes, 'I don’t know, but it’s driving me nuts!'” - Woodrow Wilson to David Lloyd George, Paris Peace Conference, 1 February 1919

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